Plymouth Mayor Mark Senter to consider City of Plymouth ID cards

By Jamie Fleury | The Pilot News (Plymouth, Ind.)
Dec 25, 2019

Photo caption: Plymouth Mayor Mark Senter met with members of La Voz Unida, representatives of La Casa de Amistad, and members of Faith in Indiana Tuesday evening to discuss the possibility of establishing and implementing a Plymouth City ID. Senter stated, “I really enjoyed this meeting with Faith In Indiana as well as La Casa De Amistad. The City has not committed to anything yet, but I look forward to working with them on this project. This will not cost the City of Plymouth taxpayers anything thanks to very involved not-for-profit organizations and their many volunteers.” | Shown in photo from left to right: Adam Thada, Father John Korcsmar, Jessica Casas, Mayor Mark Senter, Ed Rodriguez, Itzel Arroyo, Jose Cortez, and Rigoberto Flores | Middle Row: Laura Kruer, Maria Orlando Garza, Oliva Cortez, Marcela Mendez | Front Row: Juan Constantino, Norma Rodriguez, Rosalba Jaimes, and Angela Teles


PLYMOUTH — As promised at the Faith in Indiana Accountability Session held in October, Plymouth Mayor Mark Senter met with members of La Voz Unida, representatives of La Casa de Amistad, and members of Faith in Indiana Tuesday evening to discuss the possibility of establishing and implementing a Plymouth City ID.

Senter was asked to consider signing an executive order to implement a community resident ID card by February 1, 2020. The issue was discussed several years ago, and brought up again during an accountability session held by Faith in Indiana at St. Michael’s School Gymnasium in the fall.

After listening to the presentation made by Ed Rodriguez, Development Coordinator for La Casa de Amistad Juan D. Constantino Lara, Norma Rodriguez, and Special Projects Coordinator for La Casa de Amistad Jessica Gonzalez Casas, Senter agreed to consult with the City of Plymouth Attorney Sean Surrisi about possible implementation. Surrisi will be out of office until January.

If Senter signs an Executive Order to Implement a City of Plymouth ID, it will need submitted to the Plymouth Council for their approval. The card cannot be used for any purpose where Federal or State issued photo ID is required. It cannot be used for any purpose prohibited by Federal or State law.

Senter was presented with a placard specifying the intended purpose, management and potential community benefits of the program.

Purpose:

  • Are not associated with immigration status and only used for identification purposes in the issuing community for essential services
  • Do not give immigrants’ rights associated with United States Citizens
  • Cannot be used at airports or to board a plane
  • Will be implemented through Mayoral Proclamation
  • This card does not require the immigration or criminal status of an applicant
  • Does not classify the issuing city as a sanctuary
  • Are simply a means to allow an individual to prove their identity as a necessity to participate in the local community
  • Consular cards (Matricula Consular), which most immigrants carry on their person, are not typically recognized as a form of valid identification because it is not state issues nor in English.

Management:

  • Provided through a non-profit organization and is not a part of the tax base of the citizens of the community
  • Identification cards will be issued on cost basis to each recipient that will cover expenses associated with preparation
  • A non-profit organization managing the issuance ensures privacy from public record laws

Community Benefits:

  • It is beneficial to the community and law enforcement in identifying with whom they are interacting
  • Helps in emergency care to police and emergency response teams
  • Assists in securing better employment opportunities but is not a federally issued work permit
  • Access to Community Services / Businesses. Allows access to community resources including but not limited to:
    • Government buildings for services, jail visitations, courts and other secure offices
    • Libraries
    • Obtaining college transcripts
    • Hospitals
    • Clinics, including rehabilitation treatment facilities
    • Swimming Pools
    • Community Centers
    • Food Pantries
    • Schools for Children
    • Child Care’ daycare and pre-schools
    • Activities
    • Conferences
    • Disciplinary meetings
  • Better options to rental properties avoiding questionable landlords
  • Paying a purchase with a pre-paid credit card
  • Filling Prescriptions at local pharmacies
  • Picking up packages from the local Post Office or undeliverable packages at courier offices
  • Reduces fear of interactions with local law enforcement
  • Encourages involvement to assist in reporting and solving crimes
  • Better record keeping for local law enforcement and better relations with departments without fear of reprisal
  • Access to financial services
  • Savings accounts
  • Checking accounts
  • Debit cards
  • Qualifying for property tax exemptions
  • Safer to use these services as opposed to carry large sums of cash and risk harm

Alternative Uses and Benefits:

  • Identification cards eases the burden of an individual and causes a boost in the local economy
  • Aside from immigrants, Identification cards help:
  • Homeless residents
  • Law-income elderly people
  • Elderly who no longer qualify for a driver’s license but require prescriptions
  • Formerly incarcerated citizens re-entering society
  • The mentally ill and disabled
  • We are all human beings and hope this provides some individuals a path to full citizenship.

(End of placard.)

Senter stated, “I really enjoyed this meeting with Faith In Indiana as well as La Casa De Amistad. The City has not committed to anything yet, but I look forward to working with them on this project. This will not cost the City of Plymouth taxpayers anything thanks to very involved not-for-profit organizations and their many volunteers.”

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